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autumncard

Well, I just realized that I broke my own rule today.  What rule you ask?  The rule of never showing projects featuring a stamp set that is not yet available for purchase.  To me there’s nothing worse than falling in love with an image only to discover you can’t get it yet – since I personally hate waiting to buy something I like, I try to spare you all the agony too *lol*.  So what happened?  Well, my mini catalogue pre-order arrived yesterday and this stamp set was in it (it’s called Wandering Words) – it just so happens that this is one of my favorite new stamp sets in the mini and I got carried away in my excitement and couldn’t resist playing with it and the new Autumn Meadows DP.  It was literally as I was uploading this card that it occured to me that I had broken my rule.  Oh well – sometimes rules *need* to be broken right? *lol*

See the button on my card?  Notice that it’s Really Rust color coordinates perfectly with the CS and DP?  But Stampin’ Up! doesn’t carry Really Rust buttons – so where’d it come from?…….I altered it and I’m going to show you how. It’s so easy that it’s addictive.  Since I didn’t need any more Really Rust buttons I decided to create a black button and show you how I did it (after all, Halloween is just around the corner!).

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First off, you’re going to need buttons.  Now buttons with a smooth finish (such as the So Saffron button shown in the picture) are easier to alter than buttons with little nooks and crannies like the circular cream-colored buttos in you can see in the picture above.  You’re also going to need a craft ink pad or Stampin’ Spot in your desired color, some clear embossing powder, a heat tool and tweezers.  The best tweezers to use are ones that have an angled tip and are spring-loaded (you have to squeeze them to open the tip).  These tweezers were a part of the Stampin’ Up! tool kit which is no longer available, so if you don’t have any you can probably find them at your local craft store among other places.

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You want to insert the tip of your tweezers through the holes of the button.  Notice that the tips of the tweezers are just barely sticking out of the holes.  Ideally you want to keep your tweezers in this position so that you can really press your button into your ink pad without tearing up the surface of your ink pad.

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You’re now going to press your button onto the surface of your ink pad.  Because this button had a little “dip” in the center of the button front, I actually found it easier to remove my tweezers and then use my finger to squish the button against the ink pad.  I then inserted my tweezer tips and picked up my button again.  Make sure you also ink up the sides of the button.

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You can see from the picture above how well my button is covered in ink.

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Now with all other colors (other than gold and silver) I would emboss with clear embossing powder, but because I wanted the black to be really intense, and because Stampin’ Up! carries black embossing powder, I decided to use that instead. So still holding my button with my tweezers, I dipped it into the embossing powder, making sure that the sides were covered as well.  Don’t worry if embossing powder gets on the back of the button.

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Once your button is covered with embossing powder, heat it with the heat tool until all the powder melts.  The reason you need to emboss your buttons after coloring them is because on it’s own, the craft (also known as pigment) ink won’t dry – it’ll just smear off.  Make sure you heat the back of the button too in order to melt any of the powder that ended up there (that way it won’t accidentally smear onto your project later).

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Give your button a few minutes to cool thoroughly before removing it from the tweezers.  Scrape off any ink/embossing powder from your tweezer tips and then clean with a damp sponge or paper towel before putting them away.  If any of the embossing powder accumulated in the center holes of the button you can CAREFULLY clean it with a paper-piercing tool or needle – just be careful you don’t scratch the surface of your button or you will scratch off the color.

That’s all there is to it!  Now I’m really sorry, but I just have no more energy to keep typing right now, so at some point tomorrow I’ll update this post with directions on how I made the card and a full supply list.  I was up until 1 am last night because I just couldn’t sleep (I had too many ideas and thoughts floating around my head *lol*).

andreasiggy